Recent Posts

A Second Chance at Mount Whitney

Back in May, after walking almost 800 miles north on the PCT from the Mexico border, I got to the base of Mount Whitney during a snowstorm. Realizing that a Whitney ascent wasn’t going to happen for me then, I sat in my tent and cried. The next day, I bailed out of the High Sierra, vowing that I would come back to do the John Muir Trail section (which extends from Yosemite to Mount Whitney) in the summer. I was determined to finish hiking my home state atop Mount Whitney, the tallest mountain in the contiguous United States. The mountain had evaded me once but it was going to happen, dammit…

The Worst Day of the Rest of Your Life

When you’re working towards a big goal, you will inevitably experience trials and tribulations. Life doesn’t always go your way—and that’s a good thing. If it did, you wouldn’t innovate and grow. You wouldn’t appreciate the little victories nearly as much. So this is just a reminder that whatever you’re struggling with right now on your path is part of a bigger story. Zoom out and take a deep breath. You’ll make it through.

Surviving the “Halfway Blues” on a Long Hike

The “halfway blues” is a common malady for long distance hikers. The middle of a thruhike can be tough. The honeymoon phase has long since worn off and our days on the trail feel defined by routine and monotony.
It’s at this point in our hikes that we have to remind ourselves of why we wanted to do this crazy journey in the first place…

Go Into the Mountains with Utmost Respect

“Go with the utmost respect,” said a section hiker named Ingo the night before I was to hike into the Sierra. Ingo knew better than anyone how dangerous these mountains can be. Last year, his good friend Strawberry went missing in the High Sierra. Ingo was the one who notified Yosemite rangers of her disappearance. Days later, the rangers found her body in the South Fork of the Kings River…

“Bro Culture” in the Outdoor Community

There’s been a lot of talk recently about “bro culture” on long trails and in the outdoor industry in general. Last week, I experienced it firsthand on the Pacific Crest Trail—and the outcome wasn’t what I expected.